Is There Conservatism Beyond Christianity? (or how to book a mental vacation in Athens or Valhalla)

Is There Conservatism Beyond Christianity? (or how to book a mental vacation in Athens or Valhalla)

Christians on the right are used to witnessing attacks on their faith from atheistic leftists. Ever since the highly influential “cultural Marxists” of the Frankfurt School, it has become de rigeur for the chattering classes in the media and academe to tear down the historic faith of Western civilization. What often goes unnoticed among conservative Christians is that large elements of the Right often despises Christianity as well. This right-wing attack on Christianity has become a cultural phenomenon on its own, and one not yet properly understood.

End The Fed

Ron Paul’s Moment

Ron Paul’s Moment

The decades-long campaign of Ron Paul to have the Government Accountability Office do a...

Law

Original Sinner

Original Sinner

[Editor’s note: see also rounds 1-4 of Takimag’s increasingly acrimonious debate on...

Ron Paul’s Patriotic Crimethink

Ron Paul’s Patriotic Crimethink

The attempt by Congressman Ron Paul of Texas to discuss what happened and why--to account for the 9/11 terrorist attacks--is an enormous breakthrough on the American political landscape. The incident occurred during last week’s Republican “debate” among Presidential hopefuls and was aired live on Fox News from Columbia, South Carolina. This may be the first time that the subject has been broached in a serious, intelligent manner by any U.S. Presidential candidate. Rudy Giuliani saw his opportunity to grandstand, and he jumped on it. He chose to dodge, distort and demagogue the issue. As a result, Giuliani received almost a standing ovation. Not surprising. No politician on the national stage has gone, or wants to go, anywhere near the question of why New York and Washington were attacked on a clear day in September of 2001. Should some honest and frank answers be forthcoming, it would negatively impact their political careers.

Dying Hyenas in Regent’s Park

Dying Hyenas in Regent’s Park

A pair of Siamese twins in formaldehyde, provided the liquid was a shocking pink and the infants were joined together in some particularly disturbing manner, would have made for a suitable exhibit in one of the tents, as doubtless would the picture, foreshadowed in the story by Saki, of the hyenas dying in Trafalgar Square. Geeks, freaks, hairless dwarves, chess-playing automatons and sword-swallowing monkeys were at a premium...

High Life

Up For Debate

Up For Debate

The fourth and last time I debated at the Oxford Union was three or four years ago, and...

Cosmopolitan Si, Multicultural, No!

Yes, we are members of communities of faith. But there is common humanity, and, in various places and at various times, common civilizations have flourished, each articulating that common humanity in its own unique way. Our own civilization has been fairly unique in offering hospitality to those who come to us from other civilizations and their outskirts, trusting to our common humanity and to a set of institutions and traditions designed to allow members of different communities to collaborate as neighbors, clients, and colleagues. And this has worked remarkably well, at least in America. When I think of 9/11 I recall how my glass fortress diagonally opposite the World Trade Center complex was locked down by security...

Blogosphere

Libertarians!

Libertarians!

About certain moral (and legal) matters, patriotic, freedom-loving Americans agree...

Notes From the Edge

Procrastinating, From Mallorca to Marbella

Procrastinating, From Mallorca to Marbella

The longer we postpone things we must do, the harder it becomes to accomplish them,...

Politics

Who You Callin’ a Conservative?

Who You Callin’ a Conservative?

A recent syndicated column by Thomas Sowell “Republicans in the Wilderness”...

Iran

Their Intelligence and Ours

Their Intelligence and Ours

Ron Rosenbaum, journalist (the New York Observer, Slate.com), author, and one of the...

We Will Berry You!—The Flaky Socialism of the Crunchy Cons

We Will Berry You!—The Flaky Socialism of the Crunchy Cons

When you read the Crunchy Cons, one name comes up again and again. As a political movement, the group has been spearheaded by Rod Dreher, and it to him that we owe the phrase “Crunchy Cons.” Yet although he has mounted a spirited defense of the group’s credo in his Crunchy Cons: The New Conservative Culture and Its Return to Roots and writes a Crunchy Con blog, he is not the movement’s principal ideologue. That post belongs to the poet, novelist, literary scholar, and farmer Wendell Berry.

Economy

The Return of Protectionism

The Return of Protectionism

Down at the Chinese outlet store in Albany known as Wal-Mart, Chinese tires have so...

Israel and Identity

Israel and Identity

After Jesus Christ, Natan Sharansky is George Bush’s favorite philosopher. In early 2005, around the time of his second inaugural, the president praised Sharansky—ex-prisoner of the Soviet Gulag, former Israeli cabinet minister, and crusader for human rights—in effusive terms. Sharansky’s book The Case For Democracy was, in Bush’s words, part of his “presidential DNA,” a work which the leader of the free world recommended as required reading for anyone who desired to make sense of his foreign policy. It is well-nigh impossible to take this rhetoric seriously anymore, particularly in light of the failure to build democracy in nations like Iraq or Afghanistan, where undemocratic traditions so far seem to have won the battle against liberal universalism. Yet Sharansky is undaunted by these failures. In his new book, Defending Identity, he does not abandon his position, in light of these fiascos. Rather, he believes that democracies fail because they do not take account the necessity of identity.

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