Connie Schultz

Connie Schultz

Connie Schultz is a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland and the author of two books from Random House, Life Happens and . . . And His Lovely Wife. She is a featured contributor in a recently released book by Bloomsbury, The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's "A More Perfect Union".


Zeitgeist

Thanks, LeBron James, Even if You Leave

Thanks, LeBron James, Even if You Leave

May 19 2010

Boy, I sure am glad I was never the 25-year-old repository for the hopes and dreams of an entire region of the country. What’s it

PC World

Hope for the Republican Party”€”From a Liberal

Hope for the Republican Party”€”From a Liberal

May 12 2010

Kyle Robbins’ first e-mail made me smile: “Can’t say I really saw this interaction coming,” he wrote. That makes two of us, Kyle. Last month,

Afternoon Delight

Parents, Quit Eyerolling, Teach Your Kids About Sex

Parents, Quit Eyerolling, Teach Your Kids About Sex

Apr 28 2010

When it comes to memories you can’t pound out of your head with a mallet, few rival the staying power of that moment when we

Women of Faith

Non-Catholics Are Grieving, Too

Non-Catholics Are Grieving, Too

Apr 07 2010

As a columnist who isn’t Catholic, I used to feel that whatever happened in the Church was a whole lot of none of my business.

Ethics

Newspapers Should Start Naming Names

Newspapers Should Start Naming Names

Mar 30 2010

I look forward to the day when news organizations start to ban anonymous comments on their Web sites. Maybe that’s the foolish optimist in me,

Planet Earth

Turn Off the Lights To Save the Birds

Turn Off the Lights To Save the Birds

Mar 25 2010

As a culture, we’re wistful about our tallest buildings. Cities love to show off grand buildings as testaments to human endeavor. Illuminated skyscrapers are a

Obamunism

With Parkinson’s, His Voice For Health Care Grows Stronger

With Parkinson’s, His Voice For Health Care Grows Stronger

Mar 21 2010

Last Tuesday, 60-year-old Robert A. Letcher showed up for a rally outside a congressional office in Columbus, Ohio, and decided he no longer could just