Crime

Why Italy Held Amanda Knox

October 04, 2011

Ruthless reality soon disabused her of this largely media-driven indoctrination.

The Italians, in their hysterical zeal to prove themselves not “racist,” have seemingly done everything possible to frame, conspire, and otherwise collude to ensure that an African man is not solely responsible for this brutal crime despite all contrary evidence. Italian authorities were quite comfortable with this being a partially minority-on-minority crime—just so long as it did not solely involve minorities.

As if to underscore this very point, when the African Guede (whose DNA was vaginally in the victim) appealed his 30-year sentence, subsequently reduced to 16 years, there was no official objection. When Amanda Knox (without reliable DNA) appealed her own, the prosecutor not only petitioned that her original sentence of 26 years be extended to life, but that six months of it be spent in solitary confinement.

Miss Kercher’s parents have themselves been less than unbiased in their comments and behavior. They ought to want justice for their daughter, yet justice does not entail ensnaring the nearest pretty young white girl without proof.

Miss Kercher’s mother is of Indian descent, while her father is English. This further complicated a racial angle which needed no convolution. As excelsior to the inferno, it increased the maelstrom of unspoken yet frantic “anti-racism.” To this end, official Britain scarcely risks involvement despite the case concerning one of its citizens and what most barristers comprehend as a wholesale corruption of justice. Better to allow some whites to molder than wrestle with the new natives. Thus, innocents are punished for a country’s collective mental complex.

In the United States commentators such as Martin Bashir misrepresented the case on numerous occasions. One need not wonder why. Even unto the day of the reversal, Bashir made the patently false claims that Knox made an aforementioned “confession” and that Knox and her boyfriend’s alibi was untrue. In fact, their claim to have been watching a film on his computer during the murder became unverifiable only because Italian police erased the hard drive.

Clearly crimes occurred, some of commission and some of omission.

The former was the murder itself, certainly done solely by an African whose bloody handprint was found in the flat and who fled halfway across the continent before being caught. Yet Italian injustice committed its own crimes during a farcical trial which resulted in the theft of a near half-decade of life from two youngsters. The Italian prosecutor was later found guilty of abuse of office for a prior case.

Miss Knox should have been told prior to arriving in Italy that the nation only loosely coalesces to Western notions of law. She ought to have been instructed, if not by her university then by her family, that while all people are deserving of respect we live in a world of latent racial vendettas. Lodging with a girl of color would be fine…so long as there were no complications.

Yet with the first misplaced money, the first stolen item, and the first serious situation to arise, all would come to the fore. Old suspicions and hatreds are always only one accusation away. In short, to board with an unacquainted minority is a long risk.

“Legality” is often “political expedience.” If one becomes the unfortunate target of racial mongering, corrupt officials, or a government intent on demonstrating “equality,” there is little hope for a just resolution.

There may be no manner of rectifying these conditions at present, but precautions can be taken to avoid becoming one of the future newsworthy “examples.”

Thankfully Amanda Knox and her boyfriend have been set free, though they never should have been imprisoned. Their case is an admonition to us all.

In this Age of Animus, where every race seemingly seethes against every other, skirting civilization’s edge will only cause one to drive nearer to their own personal disaster.

 

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