PC World

Who Breaks a Cockroach on a Wheel?

March 29, 2012

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Who Breaks a Cockroach on a Wheel?

A scandal has raged this past week in England involving racially insensitive Tweets that landed the racially insensitive Tweeter behind bars. Liam Stacey was targeted and caged because they knew that almost nobody would want to defend him. 

Like any white person who does anything that is deemed “racist,” Stacey stands in Himmler’s shadow and elicits a similar amount of public sympathy. In the modern multicultural society, being a “racist” is put on a par with pregnancy. It’s not a question of degree; it’s all or nothing. Unlike pregnancy, you can’t even have an abortion, just a slow, painful course of liberal chemotherapy, with the constant fear that the self-appointed doctors of moral hygiene will say you’re still not cured. Pin the “R” word on somebody and you can forget all that legal crap about the Magna Carta and freedom of speech.

This is what has happened to Stacey, a young man sent to jail for 56 days for making jeering comments on Twitter about the heart attack suffered during a match by black football player Fabrice Muamba.

Mocking a man at death’s door on Twitter is terrible. Adding racial epithets obviously doesn’t help, either:


Liam Stacey’s real crime was being in charge of a Twitter account while under the influence of alcohol. His contrarian stance to the great tabloid-driven outpouring of national sympathy following the incident certainly did not go down well with Judge John Charles. Channeling the media mob’s mood, Charles said, ‘‘I have no choice but to impose an immediate custodial sentence to reflect the public outrage at what you have done.” If public outrage determines prison sentences, why isn’t Tony Blair currently serving life?

But what is the correct, calm, and proportionate response to this kind of stupid behavior? This would depend on what kind of person you are, what kind of person you thought Mr. Stacey was, and the intervening social strata.

Ignoring him may have been in the best interests of the commissariat that is increasingly trying to impose political correctness on the UK, because cases such as this can quickly become polarizing. Bringing Twitter to the legal bench in this way is the equivalent of sifting through the conversations, correspondence, and thoughts of a large proportion of our racially divided society’s population. Is that likely to increase racial harmony?

“Liam Stacey’s real crime was being in charge of a Twitter account while under the influence of alcohol.”

After Stacey made his comments he was taken to task by other Twitter users, a bit like someone turning round in a pub and saying, “Shut up, you idiot!”

But instead of leaving it there—exactly where it should have been left—it came to the attention of the UK’s increasingly plugged-in PC Stasi. The itch, which had already been scratched enough, was then officially cut open with a legal scalpel and probed for signs of moral cancer and ideological heresy.

Back in 1967 William Rees-Mogg, the editor of the Times newspaper, wrote an influential editorial entitled “Who Breaks a Butterfly Upon a Wheel?” regarding the prison sentence passed on The Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger and Keith Richards for drug possession. Mogg’s main point was that conservatives in the judiciary who disapproved of the Stones’ lifestyle singled them out to set an example.

“There must remain a suspicion in this case that Mr. Jagger received a more severe sentence than would have been thought proper for any purely anonymous young man,” Mogg wrote. Jagger’s sentence was later quashed and he got off with a lecture.

Stacey is such a “purely anonymous young man,” but that doesn’t mean he can’t be used as an example. The multiculturalist establishment knows that its immigration and refugee policies have created a society where race is on people’s minds all the time—in effect a racist society. 

The costs of this are enormous, as we see in America’s Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman case. In such societies whenever there is a minor incident where different races are involved the problem is instantly magnified and becomes insoluble.


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