Deep Thoughts

The Importance of Hatred

June 22, 2013

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The Importance of Hatred

With all the deintellectualization, deindustrialization, and dehumanization in the news it’s easy to become numb.

A looming battle with Syria for no sane reason, surrender of America to invaders without any fight whatsoever, the apparent fact few people care that their corrupt government monitors their phone calls and then financially persecutes those who offer even meager dissent—it is enough to make any thinking person throw up his hands and submit to the coming depredations.

All that remains is hate, which has kept many a man alive through much worse than what is now or is coming next.

The important thing about hate is to include it in your day the same way you do salt on eggs. A pinch is too little and a pound gives you a heart attack, but used in moderation it offers just enough of a kick to begin the morning right.

“If you don’t hate you don’t care, and if you don’t care you might as well be dead.”

To illustrate, it’s beneficial to hate the fact your country is overrun by Mexicans but not healthy to hate people solely because they’re Mexican. Likewise, it’s a good thing to hate that your military indiscriminately murders women and children half a world away but not productive to go spitting on every ordinary serviceman who enlisted trying to get healthcare and a pension for his family.
 
Among the less hateful aspects of our weakling society is the cult of forgiveness. Somehow in the past half-century the New Testament turned from rod of divine retribution into milquetoast appeasement. Did Christ forgive defilers in the temple? Not until he gave them a sound thrashing.
 
Still, every day we hear families of murder victims say they will not allow hate to dictate them. They empathize with the upbringing, unfairness, or institutional “discrimination” of the poor fellow who ruined their lives. Usually, this happens long before trial and even if an indoctrinated jury abnegates its duty and acquits. Forgiveness without penance? What the hell kind of religion is that anyway?
 
For most of my life I have been intimately involved in politics. Many colleagues have been extremely liberal even as my own views have been wildly characterized as everything from arch-socialist to proto-fascist. We hate one another’s views, yet it has not deterred us from many meals, trips, and happily argumentative hours together. Actually, I find it often strengthens my resolve.


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