Elections

Revenge of the Yahoos

November 14, 2016

Multiple Pages
Revenge of the Yahoos

A fundamental but hugely unacknowledged divide in America is the intergalactically large chasm between urban and rural culture. The city slickers and the country bumpkins might as well live on different planets. Last Tuesday, it was the perennially scorned hicks, hillbillies, and rednecks in “flyover country” who handed Donald Trump the presidency.

“Trump beat Clinton by 26 percentage points among voters who live in non-metropolitan areas, while Clinton bested Trump by about 7 percentage points in urban areas,” according to Reuters. Plotted out on a map, 2016’s presidential election results show an almost perfect divide between blue cities and red country—it’s almost like an infrared camera that renders all areas with substantial ethnic diversity and high crime in blue. From an aerial view, the huge electoral divide in America is that of city versus country. It recalls a map of Brexit results earlier in the year which shows except for the London area, nearly everywhere else in England voted to leave.

According to Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim’s New York Times, which tried with all its might throughout the campaign to crush Trump but failed:

“Last Tuesday, it was the perennially scorned hicks, hillbillies, and rednecks in ‘flyover country’ who handed Donald Trump the presidency.”

Donald J. Trump fared very poorly in American cities in Tuesday’s election. Hillary Clinton did just as badly among rural voters. The political divide between the two groups has been growing more stark in America for years, and 2016 showed an even sharper split than 2012….Mr. Trump’s own Manhattan gave him just 10 percent, a new nadir for a G.O.P. presidential candidate in the borough. His soon-to-be home, Washington, gave him just 4 percent….The counties that swung the most drastically toward Mr. Trump, by 15 points or more, were nearly all in the Midwest.

Much of the media blamed it all on white racism, but that’s the media’s job, isn’t it? Statistically, 58% of whites yanked the lever for Trump. This included 63% of white men and 53% of white women, with the Clinton’s campaign’s attempts at launching an anti-male gender war stumbling as hard as Hillary did outside her van this past September 11. A majority of young whites voted for Trump. And despite the media’s ceaseless attempts to portray all Trump voters as uneducated—I’m still waiting for any mainstream outlet to use the term “non-college-educated black voters”—he was favored by a majority of educated whites.

But it wasn’t strictly a “whitelash,” as chocolate commie cueball Van Jones insisted. Trump performed more poorly among white voters than Mitt Romney did in 2012. And more nonwhites voted for Trump than they did for Romney. Electing Trump didn’t prove America is “racist.” It proved that shouting “RACIST!” no longer works.

As I wrote in a book oh so many moons ago, rural whites have been the most openly despised and mocked racial, economic, and geographic group in America since at least the 1960s. But negative stereotypes of American “white trash” extend back centuries further. And nearly every culture on earth seems to have some sort of pejorative to describe ignorant, stupid, knuckle-dragging country folk. There are certain terms you’ve heard all your life but probably don’t realize originally were used to denote ignorant rural people. “Pagan” comes from a Latin word meaning “country people,” and “heathen” used to mean “dweller on the heath, one inhabiting uncultivated land.”

This election, America’s pagans and heathens pushed Donald Trump over the top.

What threw the election in Trump’s favor were his shocking victories in certain traditionally blue “Rust Belt” states. He lost Illinois, but only due to the lopsidedly deep blueness of the shoot-‘em-up hellhole that is modern Chicago. He took Indiana just like Romney had, but he unexpectedly stole Ohio, and Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania from the Democratic column. The latter three states haven’t voted for a Republican presidential candidate since the freakin’ 1980s. The reason Clinton lost the Rust Belt is because Democrats long ago abandoned the white working class in favor of minority identity politics. Clinton was whipped into defeat by a belt made of rust.

These states are formerly industrial and now largely bleak, vacant, and anomie-addled areas that have been decimated by the globalist trade deals that Trump hammered endlessly on the campaign trail. Despite the media’s ceaseless efforts to make the election all about race, when I saw him speak in Atlanta this past January, he didn’t make a peep about race—it was almost entirely about outsourcing, deindustrialization, and appealing to a huge swath of the nation that feels absolutely alienated and despised by DC and global elites.

The media had grown so accustomed to dismissing these rural rubes as reactionary subhumans, the election’s shocking results gave them a collective stroke. The media wound up being eaten by a monster its dishonesty had created.

According to former New York Times reporter Michael Goodwin:


…because it [The Times] demonized Trump from start to finish, it failed to realize he was onto something. And because the paper decided that Trump’s supporters were a rabble of racist rednecks and homophobes, it didn’t have a clue about what was happening in the lives of the Americans who elected the new president.

In a refreshingly honest column for CBS News, Will Rahn decries the media’s “unbearable smugness”:

[We] missed the story, after having spent months mocking the people who had a better sense of what was going on. This is all symptomatic of modern journalism’s great moral and intellectual failing: its unbearable smugness.…Journalists love mocking Trump supporters. We insult their appearances. We dismiss them as racists and sexists….That’s the fantasy, the idea that if we mock them enough, call them racist enough, they’ll eventually shut up and get in line….[We] treat the economic grievances of Middle America like they’re some sort of punchline.

But now the joke is on the media. A large segment of America grew tired and angry about being aggressively shat upon for generations not only by government policy, but by a media-academia complex that views them as subhuman and by presidential candidates who dismiss them as “bitter clingers” and “deplorables.”

The bitter clingers and deplorables from America’s heartland just told the establishment to suck it.

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