Media

NPR’s Middle-Americaphobia

March 15, 2011

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NPR’s Middle-Americaphobia

I have to admit I’ve never listened to NPR, but I assume those letters stand for Not (very good at) Public Relations?

It’s been a rough year. First came the firing of a black man, Juan Williams, by extremely white liberals for a frank and innocent remark deemed to be racist according to extremely white liberals’ interpretation of racism.

Hello?

Williams simply stated on The O’Reilly Factor that “when I get on a plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they are identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried.”

In his defense, there’s little or no history of nicely kempt, mild-mannered Presbyterians in polyester garb hijacking airplanes.

It smacks of a whole other race-based white-determined yoke of oppression for him to bear, like an albatross around Juan’s neck.

Political, social, and philosophical proclivities aside, extremely extreme extremism is obviously afoot on the public airwaves. That should be the only concern.

As last week’s “sting”-slash-luncheon attests, NPR’s motto should be, “Frankly, we don’t care for much of the public.”

Especially that, that “Middle America.”

“Deriding Dems and ‘liberals’ for blatantly, unapologetically bigoted remarks against average Americans is becoming as easy as taking Kashi bars from a baby.”

Deriding Dems and “liberals” for blatantly, unapologetically bigoted remarks against average Americans is becoming as easy as taking Kashi bars from a baby. Nevertheless, let us belabor and besmirch:

NPR fundraiser Ron Schiller had this to say in the video, describing the Tea Party as “not just Islamophobic, but really xenophobic. Basically, they believe in white, middle America, gun-toting—it’s pretty scary. They’re seriously racist, racist people.”

Racist racists are the worst kind.

What is the difference between an “Islamophobe,” a “homophobe,” a your-aggrieved-group-here-o-phobe, and a “Middle America”-phobe? When is racial stereotyping good racial stereotyping? When are dismissive generalizations based on race good dismissive generalizations based on race?

When is all this “my side right or wrong”-ness not just plain and simple jingoism? Their chauvinism is good chauvinism? For all their sniffing and pooh-poohing of “religion” (i.e., Christianity and only Christianity) and “patriotism,” they betray more false gods and sacred cows than you can shake Moses’s walking stick at. They’re waving more flags than the VFW.

The two NPR types in the video (yes, they’re stereotypes, too—they started it) aren’t exactly “just plain folk.” The “power to the people” bunch never are.


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