Cultural Caviar

Gender Offenders

November 22, 2017

My mother’s best friend married another engineer, Henry Combs. They were married from 1948 until her death in 2013. Ben Rich called Henry a “genius” in his superb memoir Skunk Works about Lockheed’s legendary R&D wing that Rich led. Combs became the technical director of the Skunk Works and, according to Rich, was the chief designer of the 2,000-mph SR-71, the most awesome airplane ever built.

The founder of the Skunk Works, Kelly Johnson, America’s most famous aeronautical engineer, married a girl in the Lockheed accounting department in 1937. When she was dying in 1969, she explained to Kelly that he was too busy to take care of himself, so she had arranged for him to marry his secretary, which he did. When his second wife was dying, she in turn found a third wife for him.

But that was Kelly Johnson in the bad old days in a conservative industry. In contrast, in progressive media industries in feminist 2017, alpha males like Weinstein and Rose treat women more like Ismail the Bloodthirsty did.

The female sex has shown that their emotional responses have not yet evolved to deal well with modern visual media. Women tend to be too impressed by the men on screen and too hell-bent to get themselves on screen.

In one of Philip Roth’s lesser novels, The Dying Animal, the narrator is a 62-year-old college professor who seduces one of his undergraduate students every semester and then discards her for a new one the following semester. How does the old dog do it? He moonlights on the local PBS channel as an arts expert for a few minutes per week. This might not seem like much fame, but for a 19-year-old coed, Roth’s narrator explains, “They are helplessly drawn to celebrity, however inconsiderable mine may be.”

Likewise, in the real world, an anonymous TV anchorman explained in 2004:

At the producing level, it’s all young women, 99 percent of whom have no chance of being on TV. They like being in TV and they like powerful men. Each host has around him lots of good-looking, unmarried women. Women are excited by power, let’s be totally clear.

Likewise, lots of women want to be on screen themselves. A female producer at CNN complained thirteen years ago:

In the last 10 years or so, it seems there are more and more young, pretty women who are just dying to be on television…. It’s just about being on television, and they’ll do anything to get there—among those things, being treated poorly.

Of course, there is little effective solidarity among women in the media business. As a female CNN producer noted:

There aren’t that many female executive producers. And they’re mean to those girls who are pretty and want to be on television.

There’s probably not a lot we can do about this, except to not pay so much heed to people on screen who lecture us about their superior morality.

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