Scandal

Ebola As Seen Through Ebonics

October 06, 2014

Multiple Pages
Ebola As Seen Through Ebonics

Our crumbling and fidgety nation is still reeling from last week’s news that a Liberian national apparently lied his way into the USA for Ebola treatment. While many of us fear that our wise and beneficent overlords in the federal government are being fatally or even apocalyptically lax in allowing an African-based disease to take root in America, it is perhaps instructive and even edifying to consider that certain “voices” in America’s black “community” are insisting that the inverse is in fact true—they’re claiming that the feds invented Ebola to depopulate the African continent.

The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan, that pioneer of musical transphobia who preaches that blacks are commandeering a giant UFO that will rain holy death upon white devils, has weighed in on the Ebola epidemic in a recent essay for the Nation of Islam’s perennially entertaining Final Call newspaper. In the clunkily titled “Justifiable Homicide: Black youth in peril, ‘An Executive Decision’ -Part 2 Continued,” Farrakhan slams neocons—hey, give the man some credit—for an alleged bio-terroristic vaccination plot to cull the African herd in order to exploit that majestic land’s mineral and scenic treasures:

“There’s a crucial difference between real conspiracies and really dumb conspiracy theories.”

Another method is disease infection through bio-weapons such as Ebola and AIDS, which are race targeting weapons. There is a weapon that can be put in a room where there are Black and White people, and it will kill only the Black and spare the White, because it is a genotype weapon that is designed for your genes, for your race, for your kind.

Farrakhan’s thought-provoking and giggle-inducing essay comes hot on the heels of another mind-blowingly irresponsible article published in the Liberian Observer called “Ebola, Aids Manufactured By Western Pharmaceuticals, Us DoD?” This scintillating piece was pecked out by one Cyril Broderick, a Liberian expat and associate professor in the Agriculture and Natural Resources department at the historically black Delaware State University. It is an open letter addressed to “Dear World Citizens” that claims Ebola is a genetically modified organism the American government is sadistically testing on West Africans. Broderick’s letter approvingly cites a “Steven [sic] King” review of the bio-thriller The Hot Zone and employs several exclamation points—never a good idea when attempting to soberly discuss science:

African people are not ignorant and gullible, as is being implicated. … Spontaneous liquefaction is what happens to the body of people killed by the Ebola virus! ... The U. S., Canada, France, and the U. K. are all implicated in the detestable and devilish deeds that these Ebola tests are. … THESE CITIZENS DO NOT DESERVE TO BE USED AS GUINEA PIGS! … The world must be alarmed. All Africans, Americans, Europeans, Middle Easterners, Asians, and people from every conclave [sic] on Earth should be astonished. … Please stand up to stop Ebola testing and the spread of this dastardly disease.

The comments section under Broderick’s article is a mother lode of conspiratorial comedy that references the Rothschilds, colloidal silver, the Georgia Guidestones, organ harvesting, the Knights Templar, Monsanto, and Bill Gates.

When questioned by the Washington Post about whether the school intended to discipline Broderick for his essay, a Delaware State U. spokesman said:

The university is not going to abridge his First Amendment rights to give his opinion about the issues of the day. … A lot of people can have tenure at a university and then they’ll go out and commit mass murder, okay. … We didn’t know that they would do that before they were granted tenure.

I’m certain that Dr. Broderick is grateful for the school’s unvarnished show of support as well as the fact that they likened him to a mass murderer.

Real live Africans haplessly trapped in Western Africa’s current Ebola hot zones—may the good Lord bless and keep them, or at least please keep them there—aren’t exactly doing good PR for the continent by murdering healthcare workers, accusing treatment centers of conducting cannibalistic rituals, and placing their faith in exorcists and witch doctors.

This is not to say that paranoia doesn’t have its place. Except for maybe Alex Jones, I’d be the first to tell you that the term “conspiracy theory” is loaded and manipulative. There have been proven conspiracies throughout world history, and if you have the remotest apprehension of human nature, it is childishly naïve to believe that human beings in power won’t do everything to maintain that power. To believe that people in very high places have our best interests in mind rather than theirs is to swallow the daffiest conspiracy theory ever concocted. Only a fool would believe that the CIA receives an unspecified black budget to keep itself awash in donuts and coffee. All things considered, it’s better to be paranoid than gullible.

After all, the use of ethnic bioweapons is a matter of historical record. Nepalese rulers purposely kept the Terai forest infected with malaria because the natives there were genetically immune to the disease while potential intruders from the Ganges plains weren’t. And if you aren’t already sick to death of hearing about the Tuskegee experiment, I’m sure that Hollywood will make another dozen or so movies about it in case you forget.

But there’s a crucial difference between real conspiracies and really dumb conspiracy theories. If American authorities really sought to depopulate Africa—rather than, say, America—with Ebola, it’d make no sense for high rollers such as Barack Obama to have such a blasé, it-can’t-happen-here, open-door policy that allowed a handful of Ebola cases to start leaking onto these shores in the late summer. If people such as Louis Farrakhan and Cyril Broderick are indeed CIA puppets, it is far less likely that this is some grand conspiracy to annihilate black people than it is to make them look silly.

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